Take Care of Our Bodies

Just received this inspirational quote in my email.

Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.

Jim Rohn
American motivational speaker, 20th century

I wish everyone could realize that their bodies are “temples” to be treasured.

We abuse ourselves with processed crap made by big corporations that only care about profits.

We are destroying our earth and we torture animals for the sake of easy food.

It’s very sad really and it overwhelms me because I do not see us ever wanting to fix it.

Friends Don’t Let Friends Eat Imported Shrimp

I found the quote “Friends don’t let friends buy imported shrimp.” on page 30 of the book “Cooking in the Moment – A Year of Seasonal Recipes” by Andrea Reusing. Those words should be an inspiration to us all!

I adore shrimp! I wish I could eat shrimp more often! But US wild-caught shrimp is expensive, so it should be savored and cherished as a special treat!

I have long refused to buy imported shrimp but it looks like I’m in the minority. Shrimp is the most consumed seafood in the US, but since 80-90% of shrimp is imported from Asia and Mexico, it looks like consumers are either not aware of the dangers or just don’t care.

I always knew there were big health and environmental risks with imported (wild and farmed) seafood, but I just read an older article on the subject and it really hit home.

quote from the article:

Properly run shrimp farms yield up to 445 pounds per acre. Food & Water Watch, which has long studied aquaculture, has documented that many foreign shrimp farm operators densely pack their ponds to produce as much as 89,000 pounds of shrimp per acre.

Oh my Lord, can you imagine the pollution, bacteria and illness this causes?

And then the article goes on to state that less than 2% of imported seafood is actually checked and/or analyzed. And what IS checked has been found to be hazardous to our health.

Consumers blindly trust that if it’s allowed to come into our country, then it must be safe. Consumers expect our government to constantly check and re-check products, whether imported or native, but it’s been proven time and time again that it’s not being done!

When will we wake up!? I am doubtful we will.

It’s the American way to demand lower prices, but look what’s happened to the quality of our food! We need to demand better quality food, but not expect to pay rock bottom prices. We need to start paying a little more, and appreciate the quality of the product!

So, please FRIENDS DON’T LET FRIENDS EAT IMPORTED SHRIMP! Support US wild caught shrimp!

Canned Tuna Reviews: American Tuna & Wild Planet

Important Disclaimer: Although there are organizations like the MSC (marine stewardship council) that suggest certain seafood choices are sustainable with an abundant supply, I don’t believe ANY seafood or meat can be completely sustainable, because there are just too many people eating it! Restraint is always needed; US tuna should not be taken for granted and shouldn’t be over-consumed even though it’s a much healthier choice than imported tuna.

american tuna canned tuna sandwich

Americans consume approximately 3 lbs of tuna per year. Canned tuna is a billion dollar business, but it remains a confusing food for consumers to purchase.

Most tuna from large commercial brands contain mercury, plus the way these companies catch tuna is deplorable! For skipjack and yellowfin, they use a large net to catch massive amounts of tuna. For albacore tuna, the most used method is a longline. Problem is, other fish like shark, dolphins, & rays plus sea animals like turtles can also be caught using both these methods, and because the fishermen only want tuna, the unwanted fish are thrown (dead or wounded) back into the ocean.

Sustainability conscience companies use the troll and/or poll & line methods. The first method, trolling is a useful way to ensure that younger smaller tuna fish are caught, which are much lower in mercury.

There are only a handful of companies that offer tuna caught in the US. I like the idea of eating US caught tuna. I cringe when I read the label on the can and see “product of Indonesia” or Thailand, or China. Even companies like 365 from Whole Foods don’t offer tuna from the US. I assume the main reason is the expense. Consumers don’t want to pay a premium for premium products!

A can of tuna from Starkist or Chicken of the Sea is under $2 (sometimes under $1), but a can of higher quality USA tuna is $4-$5. Yeah, that’s a big difference! Americans have become so used to cheap food, but they don’t bother to think about the reason as to WHY it’s so cheap. The old saying “You get what you pay for” should apply to our food as well!

Buying American caught tuna is supporting the US, and you’re getting a much higher quality product (lower in mercury, higher in Omega 3 fatty acids). The quality of the tuna can’t be compared. The texture and taste is similar to eating freshly cooked tuna. It does require a little time to get used to the taste of higher quality tuna, as our nation’s taste buds are dulled by the taste (or lack there of) of main-stream commercial brands of canned tuna. But once you learn to appreciate it, it’s so much better. I think it’s worth the extra money.

Another positive aspect of purchasing a higher quality canned tuna is that it’s packed in the tuna’s natural juices, not in water or oil; there is no need to drain the can first. So, what you are paying for is TUNA, not canning liquid like the more popular brands; canning in natural juices also allow for a higher amount of heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids to be retained.

Recommended Tuna Brands

I really enjoy two brands of US tuna: Wild Planet (See my update below) and American Tuna

Continue reading “Canned Tuna Reviews: American Tuna & Wild Planet”

Whole Foods Scallops $9.99/lb Sale Friday

This Friday, June 10th, Whole Foods Market is having a one-day sale on wild-caught sea scallops! At 9.99/lb it’s a great deal!

I’ve been told that the scallops have been caught just off the coast of Eastern Canada, and are frozen at sea to lock in their flavor. And they’re from a Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)-certified fishery, which can be a plus, although personally, I don’t always trust their judgement. :(

I’ll be shopping for scallops on Friday for sure. I do love scallops, although I don’t eat them very often. I know organizations like the MSC suggest certain seafood choices are sustainable with an abundant supply, but I don’t believe any seafood or meat can be completely sustainable, because there are just too many people eating it! So restraint is needed; scallops are lovely, but should be considered as a wonderful treat, not to be taken for granted.

Scallop Recipe links from Whole Foods:

UPDATE 2011-06-10:
Went to the local Whole Foods market today, and bought about 2.5 pounds of frozen scallops on sale. I loved that they offered them frozen! And they weren’t in a big frozen clump, they were each individually frozen, so you could thaw as little as needed. I transferred them to a freezer bag. Yum! Hopefully if we savor them, they will last all summer long! YUM!

whole foods one day only scallops on sale