What? Quack Dr. Mercola Donates $800,000 to Benefit Prop 37 GMO Labeling

I was just reading the article over at Cornucopia about big food companies hiding behind the seemingly little organic food companies, while donating hundreds of thousands (and millions) to shut down Prop 37 in California, which would require all food labels to list if the ingredients are GMO (genetically modified).

So, as I’m reading, I’m shocked to learn that Dr Mercola from DrMercola.com donated a whopping $800,000.00 in favor of the new law.

What? Wow!

How much money does this swindling health-nut actually make, that he’s able to give almost a million away to the cause! It’s sad that he’s been profiting THAT much while taking advantage of so many vulnerable people.

I hope that Dr Mercola’s contributions to Prop 37, does not give him any legitimacy; it would be a horrible circumstance if he profits more from this exposure. Or maybe that is what he’s looking for! Hmm.

But on the other hand, I hope his association with Prop 37 doesn’t disgrace the blessing that this law could bring us. After all, if GMO labeling is required in California, then every other state would benefit!

13 thoughts on “What? Quack Dr. Mercola Donates $800,000 to Benefit Prop 37 GMO Labeling”

  1. Hmm, where to begin? I think he posts a lot of advice and information with no substance behind it, and then makes money off of the info by selling a lot of supplements. There’s a lot not to like, but that’s probably my main problem with him.

    But it’s only my opinion. He obviously has a lot of believers and followers. I’m just not one of them. :(

  2. I’ve (oddly) never heard of him, but your description sounds a lot like that of another quack raking in oodles of cash by endorsing questionable supplements, a man known as the Great & Powerful Oz; with whom I’ve taken exception many, many times. Will check out the link, Debbie; thanks!

  3. Discovered your website and really enjoy it! I love your budget info. However, you should substantiate your viewpoint of Dr. Mercola by calling him a “quack”. I am a chiropractor with a long line of medical doctors in my family and who has long studied nutrition. My family tends to force me (thankfully!) to have a skeptical view of health advice since we can often and easily debate. Having said all that, there is very little I would disagree on with him in terms of health and nutrition. I find his info extremely informative and health-sound. I am a christian, so a few of his suggestions are a little too eastern-mystical for me, but it all depends on which practice he suggests. Are far as food, diet, and exercise, I just don’t often disagree.

    Which supplements he endorses would you say are questionable? Ideally, for the best health, real, organic, fresh food (right off the vine from one’s own garden is best!) is the key with emphasis on raw vegetables and some fruits as majority of diet, but also grass-fed clean meats and lots of healthy fat. But, supplements also have their place if that type of diet can’t be found, or when the body needs extra support. I have always found he bases his viewpoints on solid research. The fact that someone profits from their own hard-earned, well-substantiated knowledge does not make them a charlatan.

    I think his tremendous ($800,000!!!!) support of Prop 37 is fantastic and he deserves much credit for taking on the horrific Monsanto giant money-making machine at the expense of our world and our children’s world. He could have spent those dollars on himself or his family rather than fighting for all of us by supporting Prop 37.

    Just my two cents…

  4. Well said Angie!! As the adult daughter of a Naturopath and Master Herbalist, I couldn’t agree more with your statement.

    I’ve been getting Dr. Mercola’s newsletter for over 10 years. I discontinued Dr. Oz’s newsletter after only 6 months.

  5. I have been going to Dr. Mercola’s site for many years, and disagree with the assertion that he is a quack. Every article I have read rigorously cited sources. I don’t have the time (or the budget to subscribe to the medical journals) to go through each study, and am greatly appreciative of having his site as a resource, rather than just swallowing whatever health headline happens to be in the news.

    As far as his supplements are concerned, I do not buy them. However, I also don’t begrudge his sale of them–he is providing incredibly useful information for free, and undoubtedly has research staff who need to be paid. The fact that he sells supplements to generate revenue does not mean he is a quack, and does not negate the value of the service he provides.

  6. Wow! Dr. Mercola is anything but a quack! I’ve followed him for years now. I like that he changes his opinion occasionally. You don’t have to buy anything from him btw. I appreciate his extremely generous donation to Prop 37. We need people like him to stand up and tell the truth.
    Dr. Oz on the other hand is a hypocrite. I quit listening to him after the swine flu vaccine deal.

  7. @Angie, you said: „ I have always found he bases his viewpoints on solid research.“
    @Joannna you said: „I have been going to Dr. Mercola’s site for many years, and disagree with the assertion that he is a quack. Every article I have read rigorously cited sources.“

    So, is dr. Mercola really trustworthy? I don´t think so, but everyone can judge for yourself here. For illustration, in his recent article named „The Most Epic Drug Failure. Ever.“ (http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/09/13/most-epic-drug-failure.aspx) dr. Mercola claimes that „ The current treatments for hepatitis C are seriously lacking, inteferon and antivirals have less than a 30% response rate, …..“. Compare this statement with current scientific data: Sustained virological response (SVR) for patients with HCV infection (all genotypes 1-3)is about 2 times higher. Moreover, in patients infected with genotype 3 the response rate is nearly 100%.

    It might be also interesting to mention an opinion of one member of his community who have reached highest top Level 5 – a Super Savvy badge:
    “I’ve been saying for years that he has narcissistic personality disorder (so did George W. Bush). Symptoms include self-absorption, exaggerated sense of self-worth, lack of empathy, arrogance, and intolerance of criticism. I haven’t seen evidence of it as much in recent years, but he used to comment on his pages regularly, becoming defensive or tearing others down. His messiah-like self-esteem led him to create a special group of worshippers called the “Inner Circle” where, for a mere $25-30/month, you could wear the Inner Circle star on your badge, could be privileged to kneel at the feet of the Master, receive his special attention, and even get a binder to keep all your precious IC downloads in. He was so confident that he ordered 10,000 of these special printed binders.“

  8. “Hmm, where to begin? I think he posts a lot of advice and information with no substance behind it, and then makes money off of the info by selling a lot of supplements. There’s a lot not to like, but that’s probably my main problem with him.”

    I’m drowning in the irony of your post. Ever heard of the psychological phenomenon called “projection”?

  9. aah yes, Dr. Mercola. Its all very well to cite references, but his tentative links and interpretation of the findings are very questionable. And now in his opinion sunbeds are safe, which you can buy on his website. unbelievable

  10. Thanks for your comment, Kirsten!

    It looks like dr mercola needs to make back some of that cash he donated to the cause! I can’t believe he’s selling tanning beds! I like getting my Vit D from the good ole sun!

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